HI-TEC: High Impact Technology Exchange Conference HI-TEC: High Impact Technology Exchange Conference
HI-TEC: Educating America's Technical Workforce
HI-TEC: Educating America's Technical Workforce

ASYNCHRONOUS SESSIONS


ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES

VIDEO Scaling Elements of a Competency-Based Hybrid Instructional Model into Advanced Manufacturing Courses
Scaling Elements of a Competency-Based Hybrid Instructional Model into Advanced Manufacturing Courses This session begins with an overview of the NSF project “HOME4TECH,” in which Northwest State Community College developed a competency-based/hybrid instructional model and converted fifteen industrial technology courses to the model. Then, transitioning to the new ATE project on how to scale elements of this model into advanced manufacturing courses, the presenters show how colleges can improve the effectiveness of and access to their technical courses. Topics include alignment of curriculum to industry, assessment models, transitioning to online teaching, creating videos and other active learning objects, obtaining and implementing open educational resource (OER) material, and creating virtual simulations. Thomas Wylie (twylie@northweststate.edu), Sarah Stubblefield, Northwest State Community College, Archbold, OH

PDF Multidisciplinary Simulation: Advanced Manufacturing and Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics
Multidisciplinary Simulation: Advanced Manufacturing and Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics This project aims to prepare TDL and advanced manufacturing students for a changing workplace by exposing them to emerging technologies in a multidisciplinary work environment. This integration is designed to provide students with technical skills and discipline-specific knowledge as well as an understanding of the business side of manufacturing. Debra Jones (jonesdh@octech.edu), Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College, Orangeburg, SC

PDF Assessing Educational Pathways for Manufacturing in NW Florida: Early Findings and Implications
Assessing Educational Pathways for Manufacturing in NW Florida: Early Findings and Implications Building on prior research on career pathways in information technologies (IT), this NSF ATE targeted research project investigates the alignment of curriculum, employer needs, and new employee experience in advanced manufacturing (AM) and tests the usefulness of tools and processes developed to assess that alignment in rural institutions. The presenters share refined data analysis strategies, exciting research results to date, and directions for future work. This work is centered on rural communities and has implications for economic development and community vitality in those locales. Marcis Mardis (marcia.mardis@cci.fsu.edu), Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL; David Bouvin, Chipola College, Marianna, FL

VIDEO Bridging Gaps in Advanced Manufacturing Training for Veterans and Other Nontraditional Student Groups Using Inexpensive Portable DC/PLC Trainers
Bridging Gaps in Advanced Manufacturing Training for Veterans and Other Nontraditional Student Groups Using Inexpensive Portable DC/PLC Trainers Transitioning veterans represent a critical—and underutilized—resource for the skilled technical workforce. NEATEC has developed a Transitioning Soldier Training Program wherein, several times a year, transitioning soldiers at the U.S. Army's Fort Drum (85 miles from our campus) receive training to prepare them for the advanced manufacturing workplace. The 72-hour hands-on Advanced Manufacturing Technician “boot camp” taught near Fort Drum requires substantial creativity and resourcefulness to make it both instructive and cost-effective. We have recently added basic DC and control circuits content and an intro to PLCs into this training program to better prepare for transitioning to work with the mechatronics systems utilized in industry. This session demonstrates the trainer developed for this program, shares activities, reviews “lessons learned,” and provides attendees with curricular content and strategies for taking their training on the road to nontraditional student stakeholder groups. All materials will be available on our website: Neatec.org. Kate Alcott (alcottk@sunypoly.edu), NEATEC, SUNY Polytechnic Institute, Utica, NY; Robert Decker, Northeast Advanced Technological Education Center (NEATEC), Mohawk Valley Community College, Utica, NY

PDF Partnering with Manufacturing USA Institutes
Partnering with Manufacturing USA Institutes Created to foster partnerships among industry, education, government, and other stakeholders in advanced manufacturing technology, Manufacturing USA Institutes are valuable partners for community colleges. Because technological innovation and workforce development are key objectives of the institutes, NSF ATE grantees can benefit from participating in Manufacturing USA initiatives. This session explores several ways the Next Generation Manufacturing Center has partnered with Manufacturing USA Institutes. View this presentation to learn about the institutes, how to partner with them, and the benefits of partnering. Karen Woscyzna-Birch (KWosczyna-Birch@commnet.edu), Wendy Robicheau, Regional Center for Next Generation Manufacturing (RCNGM), Farmington, CT; John Birch, The Birch Group, Farmington, CT; Eric Flynn, Gateway Community College, New Haven, CT

VIDEO Advanced Manufacturing and Automation Flexible Delivery
Advanced Manufacturing and Automation Flexible Delivery With the arrival of manufacturers such as Tesla and Panasonic, the Reno area has a growing need for competent technicians in advanced manufacturing and automation-flexible delivery. To generate the workforce necessary to meet this need, Truckee Meadows Community College (TMCC) created easy-to-use, flexible courses that appeal to incumbent technicians, lower-skilled workers, and students with nontraditional schedules. These courses include hybrid segments of our three-credit classes that allow students to take one or two segments at a time. These segments are open-entry, closed-exit classes with flexible lab times that are stackable toward a BAS degree. Randal Walden (rwalden@tmcc.edu), Pat Jarvis, Truckee Meadows Community College, Reno, NV

PPT Trends in Mechatronics, Automation, and Industry 4.0 Technician Education
Trends in Mechatronics, Automation, and Industry 4.0 Technician Education This session will host an open discussion with a panel of experienced mechatronics educators about what new technical skills their industry partners need from program graduates. The panel will respond to questions about what aspects of Industry 4.0 are already being implemented in their industry partner facilities and what is “coming soon.” Attendees will learn from the mechatronics, automated manufacturing, and Industry 4.0 technician education community and share their own best practices, tips and tricks, and daring challenges that can help us all keep up with or even get ahead of the work of the future for technicians. Marilyn Barger (mbarger@usf.edu), Florida Advanced Technological Education Center (FLATE), Tampa, FL; Andy Roberson, Gadsden State Community College, Gadsden, AL; Eric Breeder, Charlottesville, VA; Kenneth Floyd, Front Range Community College, Westminster, CO

VIDEO Generative Design in the Additive Manufacturing Ecosystem
Generative Design in the Additive Manufacturing Ecosystem This session will showcase utilization of artificial intelligence tools and cloud computing power to design components for a Kara learning machine. Participants will learn to develop a generative design using the Fusion 360 design software suite and manufacture the design using a metal 3D printer. Mahmood Lahroodi (mlahroodi@cvtc.edu), Hans Mikelson, DREAM (Developing Resources for Enhancing Additive Manufacturing), Chippewa Valley Technical College, Eau Claire, WI

VIDEO Hands-on Technician Training (HoTT) at South Arkansas Community College
Hands-on Technician Training (HoTT) at South Arkansas Community College South Arkansas Community College is redesigning three foundational advanced manufacturing courses in process technology and industrial technology and will offer them in a hybrid format. These courses will be part of a new one-semester certificate of proficiency that leads to entry-level jobs or can be the foundation upon which students pursue additional coursework. The courses will incorporate competency-based learning outcomes and open labs with industry-specified hands-on activities and assessments. The project addresses industry’s need for higher-skilled technicians. David Carty (DCarty@southark.edu), Ray Winiecki (RWiniecki@southark.edu), South Arkansas Community College, El Dorado, AR


BIO AND AGRICULTURAL TECHNOLOGIES

VIDEO Increasing the Student Biotech Pipeline: From Classroom to Career
Increasing the Student Biotech Pipeline: From Classroom to Career This presentation focuses on how the Los Angeles Mission College biotechnology program formed partnerships with high schools (through dual enrollment and summer workshops), worksource centers, and industry partners. Activities involved students in project-based learning, poster exhibitions, field trips, speakers, and externships leading to employment. Chander Arora (aroracp@lamission.edu), Par Mohammadian, Los Angeles Mission College, Sylmar, CA

VIDEO Build or Expand Your Program: Pathways in Biomedical Engineering Technology
Build or Expand Your Program: Pathways in Biomedical Engineering Technology Looking for ideas for a new pathway in engineering technology? Come explore the possibilities of expanding your existing engineering or biomedical program with new pathways in medical device repair, manufacturing, and medical device security. We will take you through our competency-based approach to building credentials. Participants will be provided with content such as microcredentials/badging documentation, course outlines, college credit certificate documentation, course activities, high school outreach activities, and instructional videos. Brian Bell (Bell.Brian@spcollege.edu), Lara Sharp, St. Petersburg College, Tarpon Springs, FL

PDF BETA Skills: The Skillset for the Future Tissue Engineering and Biomedical Devices Tech
BETA Skills: The Skillset for the Future Tissue Engineering and Biomedical Devices Tech BETA Skills is a diverse, multi-stakeholder project that is defining the future technical skills that will be used in producing biomedical devices that overlap with the marvels of tissue engineering. What do companies working in this milieu expect their technicians to be able to do at a competitive level? By working with industry, educators, and workforce experts, we have defined the most probable skillsets that will be required for entry-level technicians in this converging area. Russ Read (rread@forsythtech.edu), National Center Biotechworkforce of ForsythTech, Winston Salem, NC

PDF Bioscience Technician Expansion Project Year Two
Bioscience Technician Expansion Project Year Two The second year of the Bioscience Technician Expansion Project (NSF grant #1800850) has brought new insights to the development of transfer pathways to four-year colleges and universities and outreach opportunities. This poster highlights our work on transfer agreements with Ashland University and the University of Findlay. Justin Tickhill (JTickhill@ncstatecollege.edu), Jason Tucker, North Central State College, Mansfield, OH


ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES

PDF Enlightened Education: Implementing Solar Engineering Design to Energize School Facilities
Enlightened Education: Implementing Solar Engineering Design to Energize School Facilities This session explores the potential for universities, colleges, and K-12 schools to implement solar electric infrastructure projects on their campuses that provide learning environments and instructional opportunities for students. A recent case study of a 1.85 MWdc photovoltaic system at Madison Area Technical College—the largest solar rooftop installation in the state of Wisconsin—is presented. That system has several unique features designed to facilitate public access, provide students with hands-on interaction with the system, and compare and contrast different types of solar equipment. Madison College completed a solar roadmap to prioritize and sequence investment in solar across the multiple buildings and campus locations operated by the college. A ten-step guide on how to create a solar roadmap is shared so that other schools can learn from Madison College’s experience and replicate the process. Ken Walz (KWalz@madisoncollege.edu), Joel Shoemaker, Center for Renewable Energy Advanced Technological Education (CREATE), Madison, WI

PDF Goals: Awareness and Equality
Goals: Awareness and Equality This presentation emphasizes the world around us and uses spatial technology to address the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). The presented material speaks especially to educators and their students about issues associated with poverty, equity, diversity, education, climate change, and sustainable cities. From an educational perspective, students increase technology skills, develop problem-solving skills, and gain awareness of global issues. Using a free software package, a step-by-step exercise is presented. The presenters provide technology-based, problem-centered exercises that can be adapted to any area of expertise. Richard Schultz (richardbschultz720@gmail.com), National GeoTech Center of Excellence, Arlington Heights, IL; Joseph Kerski, Esri, Chicago, IL

PDF Integrated Wind and Wave Power Systems Comprising State-of-the-Art Linear and Rotary Generators
Integrated Wind and Wave Power Systems Comprising State-of-the-Art Linear and Rotary Generators In this project students from multiple disciplines will collaborate in building a state-of-the-art integrated wind and wave power laboratory. The laboratory will have an ocean-like ecosystem with wind and wave simulations. A student-designed, student-built generator will be implemented and observed for over a year. Highly efficient linear and rotary generators will be integrated into the system along with a rectifier, energy storage, and more. The laboratory will be used by undergraduate and graduate students for research on wind and wave power systems. Natalie Gardner (Natalie.Gardner@oit.edu), Project Wave, Alsea, OR; Noah Sharrott, Oregon Institute of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR

PDF Learning Abroad, Learning Together: How Successful International Professional Development Works
Learning Abroad, Learning Together: How Successful International Professional Development Works CREATE’s Energy Storage Project was initially tasked with gathering knowledge on energy storage and education. Recognizing that model programs in this area have been pioneered and established in Germany, CREATE organized an educator study tour to learn about these technologies and related workforce preparation. The evidence-based collaborative learning model that CREATE developed supports educators in gathering and preserving knowledge and facilitates the collaborative knowledge-building of the participant cohort. This session describes the model, presents outcomes and impacts of participant involvement, and provides recommendations for crafting educator professional development, especially where international travel is involved. Mary Slowinski (maryslowinski@comcast.net), CREATE Energy Storage Project, Madison, WI; Gabrielle Temple, Ken Walz, Center for Renewable Energy Advanced Technological Education (CREATE), Madison, WI


ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES

PPT Modeling SCME Microcantilever Using Solidworks
Modeling SCME Microcantilever Using Solidworks This presentation shows how to model SCME microcantilevers in support of MEMS education. The resonant mode of vibration of various cantilever beams supplied in the SCME microcantilever kits is evaluated to see how the resonant mode of vibration of a cantilever beam is influenced by mass, modules of elasticity, and beam dimensions using the 3D CAD software Solidworks. Andrew Bell (abell118@ivytech.edu), Ivy Tech Community College, Fort Wayne, IN

VIDEO Profiles of Technical Workforce Programs and Students at Two-year Colleges
Profiles of Technical Workforce Programs and Students at Two-year Colleges The recent National Science Board’s report titled The Skilled Technical Workforce: Crafting America’s Science and Engineering Enterprise cites the need to address data gaps and data silos so that industry and educational institutions can maximize the effectiveness of programs and initiatives. The report names this issue as a systemic challenge to the creation of the vibrant, highly skilled technical workforce the United States needs. The American Society for Engineering Education has begun a two-year project designed to collect relevant data from community college engineering technology programs. This presentation will introduce the new data collection and provide the community our plan for the Fall of 2020. Joseph Roy (J.Roy@asee.org), Ashok Agrawal, American Society for Engineering Education, Washington, DC

VIDEO LASER-TEC Case Study: Building and Leveraging Supportive Industry Partnerships
LASER-TEC Case Study: Building and Leveraging Supportive Industry Partnerships Though job growth in technical fields is on the increase, finding, establishing, and leveraging industry partners is a struggle for some technical educational programs. This presentation explores successful approaches to locating industry partners, establishing a strong win-win connection with them, and leveraging their knowledge and resources to drive the growth and continued improvement of your technical educational program. Industry partnership pitfalls to avoid and overcome are also discussed. Strategies for building and maintaining dynamic, supportive partnerships through the Laser Program Advisers are shared. Gary Beasley (gbeas207@cccc.edu), LaserTec, Central Carolina Community College, Lillington, NC; Chrys Panayiotou, LaserTec, Indian River State College, Fort Pierce, FL

PDF Lidar Technology and Its Diverse Applications
Lidar Technology and Its Diverse Applications Light detection and ranging (Lidar) uses laser beams and the scattered reflections from objects to determine the distances between laser sources and objects. With Lidar we can accurately map shorelines, rivers and lakes, and ancient sites; monitor the health of crops; analyze the content of prescription drugs; detect illegal drugs; create 3D maps of spaces; assist in the navigation of self-driving cars, planes, and boats; and much more. Viewers learn the basic principles of the construction and operation of different kinds of Lidar systems, see a demonstration of a Lidar system, and receive pointers on selecting systems for purchase. Anca Sala (asala01@baker.edu), Baker College, Flint, MI; Chrys Panayiotou, LaserTec, Indian River State College, Fort Pierce, FL

PDF Developing Photonics Education for Iowa’s Rural Secondary Schools
Developing Photonics Education for Iowa’s Rural Secondary Schools This session covers the steps involved in creating and conducting a dual-credit online/hybrid photonics (lasers and optics) fundamentals high school course. Topics include ways to inform high school administrators, students, and teachers that build enthusiasm for the opportunities in the laser and optics industry. The presenter will discuss course and lab development and how the course helps to meet the main objective of increasing the supply of lasers and optics technicians. Frank Reed (frank.reed@indianhills.edu), Indian Hills Community College, Ottumwa, IA


INFORMATION, COMMUNICATIONS, AND GEOSPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES

PDF Employability Skills and Their Application to Project Management: Developing the IT Workforce
Employability Skills and Their Application to Project Management: Developing the IT Workforce Workflow skills are the nontechnical skills necessary for success in the workplace. These include working in teams, collaboration, problem solving, verbal communication, written communication, dependability/work ethic, and planning/organizing for IT project management. This session outlines the Trello/Kanban workflow process utilized in an IT hardware upgrade project for two labs at Wharton County Junior College and the resulting lessons learned by stakeholders of the project. J.B. Groves (jbgroves@wcjc.edu), Wharton County Junior College, Richmond, TX

PPT Community College Student Decision Making About Information Technology Programs and Careers
Community College Student Decision Making About Information Technology Programs and Careers How do students decide among the many community college pathways? What most impacts student decision-making and ultimately student retention and success? Rutgers University and Ivy Tech Community College are conducting an NSF-funded research project on factors that motivate students to enter information technology programs and careers. The presenters share findings on student decision making, what drives these decisions, and how institutional policies and practices impact them. Viewers will learn about the presenters’ findings and gain insights on how to advise students in an ever-growing, ever-changing field. Michelle Van Noy (mvannoy@smlr.rutgers.edu), Education and Employment Research Center, Rutgers, Piscataway, NJ; Matthew Cloud, Ivy Tech Community College, Lake County Campus, Gary, IN

PDF Introduction to Bitcoins, Blockchains, and Smart Contracts
Introduction to Bitcoins, Blockchains, and Smart Contracts This presentation introduces bitcoins, blockchains, and smart contracts programmed with Ethereum Blockchains and the Solidity programming language. Cryptocurrencies such as bitcoins use blockchains and smart contracts to enforce transactions. Solidity is the programming language that is used to create smart contracts that are stored on the blockchain. Debasis Bhattacharya (debasisb@hawaii.edu), University of Hawaii Maui College, Kahului, HI

VIDEO Connecting to the NEXUS Using IIOT Sensors
Connecting to the NEXUS Using IIOT Sensors Do you know what the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) is? Do you want to learn more? Or how to teach related concepts? If so, this session is for you. IIoT deploys data collection and analysis in industrial settings. Sensors populate a web-based database, which facilitates decision-making and thus enhances productivity, safety, and efficiency. Viewers will observe a variety of hands-on activities and draw conclusions as to how these activities apply to real-world problems. Activities involve deployment of sensors in simulated environments related to lean manufacturing, preventive maintenance, and just-in-time inventory. Lyndsie Gibbs (lmgibbs@mccneb.edu), Mike Guericke, Metropolitan Community College, Omaha, NE

PDF Teaching Advanced Networking Concepts Using a Raspberry Pi
Teaching Advanced Networking Concepts Using a Raspberry Pi Two of the biggest issues that schools have in teaching a practical “hands-on” approach to advanced networking topics are, first, facilities (many labs require expensive servers, routers, firewalls, workstations, etc.) and, second, equipment (commercial networking servers and storage devices are expensive to purchase and maintain). This session shows how you can use a Raspberry Pi (a small, inexpensive, open-source-based computer) to provide students the opportunity to learn advanced networking concepts. The presentation includes information on labs that can be easily put together to provide hands-on, practical projects. Bill Saichek (saichekb.9020@gmail.com), Orange Coast College, Costa Mesa, CA Handouts

VIDEO Remote Delivery of Hands-on IT Courses Using Zoom
Remote Delivery of Hands-on IT Courses Using Zoom Northark is in its second year of providing IT/networking classes to remote students using Zoom technology to synchronously deliver courses taught on the main campus. Other supports at the remote site include lab assistants, dedicated equipment, and virtual labs. The presenters share details on the technology, equipment, costs, what is working, and what should be improved. Laura Berry (lberry@northark.edu), Rick Williams, North Arkansas College, Harrison, AR

VIDEO Engaging Business to Predict the Future
Engaging Business to Predict the Future As technology evolves at an ever-faster pace, education programs must keep up to make sure graduates are workforce ready. The NSF project titled IT Skill Standards 2020 and Beyond employs the BILT model to engage IT employers in predicting the future and developing “future-proofed” skill standards. This process started with 90+ “thought leader” CIOs across the nation identifying the top IT job clusters. From there, multiple cluster groups are convening one by one to standardize entry-level tasks, knowledge, skills, and abilities. Learn more about strategies for leading your business experts in keeping your program ahead of the curve. Ann Beheler (abeheler@gmail.com), Mark Dempsey (mdempsey@collin.edu), National Convergence Technology Center (CTC), Frisco, TX PDF

VIDEO Enhancing Classroom Experiences Through Spiraling Curriculum
Enhancing Classroom Experiences Through Spiraling Curriculum Through a grant, we reviewed classes aligned to industry certification objectives that were found to be redundant. Using a spiraling curriculum, we took these redundancies and created an in-depth curriculum for IT degrees. In this session, we discuss the framework we used and provide an outcome matrix that other institutions can implement. Eric Renegar (eric.renegar@sinclair.edu), Kyle Jones, John Neff, Sinclair Community College, Dayton, OH


LEARNING, EVALUATION, AND RESEARCH

VIDEO Pathway to Success: NSF ATE Funding Options and Mentor-Connect Proposal Development Assistance
Pathway to Success: NSF ATE Funding Options and Mentor-Connect Proposal Development Assistance Find a pathway to success with your first or second proposal, or even a resubmission of a proposal that was not initially funded. The National Science Foundation-funded Mentor-Connect project is a proven strategy for preparing competitive proposals. Viewers will learn about available NSF ATE funding options and about free mentoring and technical assistance throughout the proposal preparation and funding process. The funding rate for proposals from Mentor-Connect colleges is 74 percent (cohorts 1–7), with 86 percent of the 164 participating colleges to date submitting proposals (cohorts 1–8). Elaine Craft (Elaine.Craft@fdtc.edu), Mentor-Connect: Leadership Development and Outreach for ATE, Florence-Darlington Technical College, Florence, SC

VIDEO Successful Scaling: Strategies for Expanding the Capacity and Impact of Your Program
Successful Scaling The National CTC has successfully scaled two programs from limited local implementation to broad national scope: the “BILT model,” which formalizes curriculum co-leadership between business and educators, and the “community of practice,” in which a network of college faculty members regularly share know-how. In this case study discussion, attendees will understand how lessons learned from scaling these programs can be applied to maximize the reach and capacity of their own colleges’ projects and programs while minimizing impact on staff and budget. This session will provide scaling strategies that can work with any technical discipline. Ann Beheler (abeheler@gmail.com), Mark Dempsey (mdempsey@collin.edu), National Convergence Technology Center (CTC), Frisco, TX

VIDEO Increase Student Engagement and Equity in Your Classroom Using Active Learning
Increase Student Engagement and Equity in Your Classroom Using Active Learning Do you want to make sure you are engaging all students? Do you want to include instructional activities that encourage student participation in your classroom? The presenters provide examples used in their own classrooms, show how they were developed, and share how items were adjusted for the online classroom. Viewers will acquire tips and free resources that will help you implement active learning strategies in the classroom. Pamela Silvers (pamelajsilvers@abtech.edu), Jim Sullivan, Rachael Tipton, Amanda Flynn, Skilled Workers Get Jobs, Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College, Asheville, NC

PDF Just-in-Time Remediation for Early College and AAS Students
Just-in-Time Remediation for Early College and AAS Students This poster relates to remediation for students whose insufficient backgrounds in science and mathematics often cause low grades, low course retention, and low rates of degree completion. This approach provides remediation in science and mathematics at every point during the semester. At Forsyth Tech, this remediation is being accomplished in two ways. First, Early College students are offered additional opportunities to meet with faculty outside of class to review materials and introduce and reinforce difficult concepts. Second, remediation content is built into the curriculum of an AAS program. Dwaine Davis (ddavis@forsythtech.edu), Forsyth Tech Community College, Winston-Salem, NC

VIDEO Engaging K-12 Educators in Technology Instruction
Engaging K-12 Educators in Technology Instruction Wondering how to engage K-12 educators with your content? This session presents best practices in instructional design for K-12 educators. The session focuses on pedagogy that can increase K-12 engagement while decreasing anxiety educators may feel about unfamiliar technologies. The presenters discuss strategies for addressing and troubleshooting obstacles that keep K-12 educators from engaging in technology instruction, including financial obstacles, time management, lack of familiarity with emerging technologies, and evaluation. Viewers will learn about supports that can be the final push to get K-12 educators involved in their center’s content. Mary Ann Nickloy (MNickloy@sunypoly.edu), Kelly Fahrenkopf, Elaine Garrett, Northeast Advanced Technological Education Center (NEATEC), Suny Polytechnic Institute, Albany, NY

PDF Technician Education in Germany: Lessons Learned from a Recent Visit
Technician Education in Germany: Lessons Learned from a Recent Visit The German Dual Educational System is the envy of the world in technician education. It is what we call the apprenticeship system here in the United States. During a recent trip to Germany we visited the Federal Department of Vocational Education, which has overseen 330 apprenticeship programs since 1919. We visited a photonics technical school established by industry within the dual system to train the workforce for three optics/photonics companies. We also visited Trumpf Inc., a major high-power laser manufacturer that has its own technician training program. The three different approaches to technician education are described along with lessons learned. Chrys Panayiotou (cpanayio@irsc.edu), Mo Hasanovic, LaserTec, Indian River State College, Fort Pierce, FL; Gary Beasley, LaserTec, Central Carolina Community College, Lillington, NC

VIDEO Formative Assessment Systems for ATE 2
Formative Assessment Systems for ATE 2 Do you need to capture data on the effectiveness of your professional development program? We can help. The goal of Formative Assessment Systems for ATE 2 is to refine, test, validate, and disseminate a set of assessment tools that you can use to collect data on the effectiveness of your professional development activities, particularly student-level assessment data. We will cover information about formative assessment, the “toolkit” under development, and ways you can begin using these tools right now. Robin Datta (rdatta@email.edcc.edu), Edmonds Community College, Lynn, WA; Amy Gullickson, Mia Chen, Centre for Program Evaluation, Melbourne Graduate School of Education, Melbourne, Australia

VIDEO Building Connections between Education and Industry
Building Connections between Education and Industry Northwestern Connecticut Community College is working with the Torrington School District and area manufacturers to introduce middle and high school students and their teachers to technical skills and technical careers. This collaborative effort involves providing STEM activities for students, introducing students and teachers to technical industries, and providing math tutoring for students. The presenters share how they structured their program and how they engaged teachers, students, and industry. The impact of this activity on the teachers and students is addressed by one of the high school teachers in the program. Sharon Gusky (SGusky@nwcc.commnet.edu), Northwestern Connecticut Community College, Winsted, CT; Douglas Mooney, Northwestern Connecticut Community College, Winsted, CT; Christine Gamari, Torrington High School, Torrington, CT

VIDEO Engage Your Students with Creative Data Visualization Projects
Engage Your Students with Creative Data Visualization Projects Looking for engaging programming projects for students? Rather than coding solutions to isolated, abstract problems, do you want to embed exercises in a wider and even interdisciplinary context? If so, you’ll be interested as we show and discuss examples of students coding their own infographics, interactive visualizations, and simulations. Working from data they collect, or from web-based data sources, students can use almost any programming language, leveraging beginner-to-intermediate skills to produce informative, graphical solutions. Examples from introductory to advanced, in languages ranging from Java and Python to Linux shell scripts, are shown and discussed. Gerald Reed (greed9@valenciacollege.edu), Valencia College, Orlando, FL

VIDEO Evalu…what? A Quick Introduction to Evaluation
Evalu…what? A Quick Introduction to Evaluation Required to have an evaluation of your grant? Never worked with an evaluator before? Not even sure what evaluation is? This presentation is a crash course for people who might be nervous, skeptical, or hesitant about engaging in evaluation. Viewers will learn what evaluation is, how evaluation can improve their projects, and why they should be excited about evaluation. Evaluation should be more than just another box to check. Learn about resources on how to get started with your evaluation and tips for writing evaluation plans and selecting evaluators. Lyssa Wilson Becho (lyssa.becho@wmich.edu), EvaluATE, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI

VIDEO Data-Driven Proposals: Using ATE Survey Findings in Your Next ATE Proposal
Data-Driven Proposals: Using ATE Survey Findings in Your Next ATE Proposal This session is a must-see for anyone thinking about submitting a proposal to the National Science Foundation’s Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program or anyone interested in seeing findings from the most recent annual ATE Survey. The presenters highlight findings from the 2019 annual ATE survey to provide a general grounding in ATE activities. They also discuss how survey findings can be used to help guide ATE proposals. Viewers will gain a better understanding of ATE grantees’ work and how their potential ATE proposals may supplement or otherwise fit into this landscape. Valerie Marshall (valerie.marshall@wmich.edu), Lyssa Wilson Becho (lyssa.becho@wmich.edu), EvaluATE, Kalamazoo, MI

VIDEO The Revolutionary Effects of Emerging Technology on the Future of Society and Industry
The Revolutionary Effects of Emerging Technology on the Future of Society and Industry This session provides an overview of the digital age and the revolutionary effects of technologies such as blockchain, artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, cloud computing, and biotechnology on humanity’s social, medical, economic, and political existence. Rae Rawley (RRawley@pencol.edu), Peninsula College, Port Angeles, WA

PDF Using Social Network Analysis to Evaluate the Development of Professional Connectivity
Using Social Network Analysis to Evaluate the Development of Professional Connectivity The success of initiatives aimed at the development of our skilled technical workforce increasingly depends on the continual growth and strengthening of professional interpersonal connections such as those between education and industry professionals. Social network analysis (SNA) provides a useful methodology for evaluating and describing the structure and development of interpersonal connections within these contexts. Viewers will learn the foundational concepts of SNA and practical guidelines for capturing the survey data necessary to conduct the SNA. The session also includes a demonstration of open-source software for running analyses and generating graphical illustrations of the network. Mike FitzGerald (mfitzgerald@therucksgroup.com), Lana Rucks, The Rucks Group, Dayton, OH; Emma Anne Leeburg, EvaluATE, Kalamazoo, MI


MICRO AND NANOTECHNOLOGIES

PPT Online Visualization and Simulation Tools for Enhancing Students Learning of Nanotechnology
Online Visualization and Simulation Tools for Enhancing Students Learning of Nanotechnology Visualization and simulation at the nanoscale coupled with measurements enhance students’ understanding of the material world at the smallest levels of matter where intuition and textbook examples alone are not enough. The purpose of our presentation is to discuss the use of free online visualization and simulation tools to teach nanotechnology. Professors can use these online tools to enhance students' learning of complex concepts at nanoscale without buying expensive equipment. These tools include 26 RAIN (remote access instruments in nanotechnology) nodes for accessing visualization instruments and 500+ simulation tools at nanoHUB that enable students to simulate nanotechnology concepts. Ahmed S. Khan (Dr.A.S.Khan@ieee.org), Fulbright Scholar / World Learning Inc, Washington DC; Sala Qazi, SUNY Polytechnic Institute, Utica, NY; Atilla Ozgur Cakmak, Penn State University, State College, PA

VIDEO Two-Tier Vacuum Technology Learning System for Semiconductor and Nanotech Manufacturing Tech Training
Two-Tier Vacuum Technology Learning System for Semiconductor and Nanotech Manufacturing Tech Training This three-part program consists of (1) an overview of the vacuum, RF, and plasma technology skills required of technicians in the nanotech and semiconductor industries and the resultant design learning system suitable for community college and technical high school curricula as well as for incumbent worker training; (2) an overview (including live demo) of the assembled trainers and the vacuum, RF, and plasma technology content and lab activities involved in using our trainers; and (3) a review of the initial implementation of this system with community college and high school students and incumbent semiconductor technicians. Robert Geer (rgeer@sunypoly.edu), Abe Michelen, Robert Decker, Stephen Stewart, Northeast Advanced Technological Education Center (NEATEC), SUNY Polytechnic Institute, Utica, NY

PPT Low-Cost Thermal Evaporation System at Rough Vacuum for Lift-off and Nanotechnology Education
Low-Cost Thermal Evaporation System at Rough Vacuum for Lift-off and Nanotechnology Education This session demonstrates the construction and operation of an affordable thermal evaporation system built from off-the-shelf parts at rough vacuum (10–50mT). If you have a chemistry/physics department at your school, you can probably borrow many of the items or you can build a system from scratch for far less than purchasing a turnkey system. The demo is embedded in the PowerPoint. Tony Klejna (klejnaa@ecc.edu), Rich Hill, SUNY Erie, Williamsville, NY

PDF Using Nanotechnology As a Pathway to Promote Underrepresented Minority Students in STEM Fields
Using Nanotechnology As a Pathway to Promote Underrepresented Minority Students in STEM Fields A nation flourishes to the extent that it utilizes all of its resources in pursuing the full potential of its citizens. To provide the workforce necessary for today’s technology-driven economy, the USA must draw significant numbers of STEM professionals from its underrepresented minority (URM) population. This session describes a model in which universities, community colleges, and industry partners collaborate in utilizing nanotechnology as a pathway to enable URM students to apply their full talent to scientific, engineering, and technological fields, thereby meeting the growing demands of high-tech industries. Atilla Ozgur Cakmak (aoc10@psu.edu), The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Robert Ehrmann, Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge Support Center (NACK), University Park, PA; Thomas Stoudt, Tidewater Community College, Virginia Beach, VA

VIDEO Building a Technology Collaborative to Maximize National Workforce Impact
Building a Technology Collaborative to Maximize National Workforce Impact Viewers will learn how to collaborate, share ideas, and join the Micro Nano Tech (MNT) Education community to strengthen and augment Micro Nano Technology workforce programs and connect with industry to better prepare students for tomorrow’s MNT workforce. Matthias Pleil (mpleil@unm.edu), University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Robert Ehrmann, Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge Network (NACK) Support Center, University Park, PA; Jared Ashcroft, Pasadena City College PDF

VIDEO Measuring Success of Virtual Reality Pre-Training for Nanotechnology Instrumentation
Measuring Success of Virtual Reality Pre-Training for Nanotechnology Instrumentation How well do virtual reality simulations prepare students to carry out experiments on real equipment of the complexity encountered in nanotechnology laboratories? This session presents the impacts of using VR to teach students the operational steps involved in using an RF sputter deposition machine, an electron microscope, and a photolithography lab—when followed by completion of the same experiment on the real apparatus. Student attitudes toward, confidence with, and understanding of the real machines after VR training will be assessed. Paul Weber (Paul.Weber@uvu.edu), Utah Valley University, Orem, UT


SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES

PDF Cybersecurity for Advanced Manufacturing Organizations
Cybersecurity for Advanced Manufacturing Organizations This session describes the planning and early implementation strategy used to develop virtual training scenarios designed to increase cybersecurity preparedness for advanced manufacturing organizations. The session describes the scenarios’ function within a “Cybersecurity Range” that can be utilized by private companies, educational institutions, the military, and individuals throughout the state. Tony Hills (thills@northweststate.edu), Northwest State Community College, Archbold, OH

VIDEO Innovative Resources for Teaching and Assessment of Cybersecurity and Other STEM Courses
Innovative Resources Brookdale Community College’s E-MATE project and Moraine Valley Community College’s CSSIA Center have collaborated to develop two innovative new resources. One is a series of web-based interactive explainers in networking, electronics, security, and other STEM disciplines. The other is a capture the flag (CtF) game modeled on the classic Risk game. Presenters demonstrate interactives and demonstrate the CtF environment. Viewers will learn about interactive content they can integrate into their classes and programs and opportunities to use the CtF to assess their students. Michael Qaissaunee (mqaissaunee@brookdalecc.edu), E-MATE 2.0, Brookdale Community College, Lincroft, NJ; John Sands, National Center for Systems Security and Information Assurance (CSSIA), Palos Hills, IL

PDF ACM’s New Cybersecurity and Information Technology Curricular Guidance for Two-Year Degree Programs
ACM’s New Cybersecurity and Information Technology Curricular Guidance for Two-Year Degree Programs The ACM Committee for Computing Education in Community Colleges (CCECC) has recently released curricular guidance for associate degree programs in cybersecurity and information technology. This poster session features an overview of the curriculum content along with insights into its application in two-year programs and its alignment with broadly accepted frameworks such as the NICE Cybersecurity Workforce Framework and the ACM IT2017 guidelines. Cara Tang (cara.tang@pcc.edu), ACM CCECC and Portland Community College, Portland, OR; Markus Geissler (markus.geissler@crc.losrios.edu), ACM CCECC and Cosumnes River College, Sacramento, CA

VIDEO Project Update for Cyber Up! Digital Forensics and Incident Response
Project Update for Cyber Up! Digital Forensics and Incident Response Cyber Up! focuses on the development of curriculum for teaching the cybersecurity knowledge and skills involved in digital forensics and incident response (DFIR). These skills must be deployable in real-time and are dynamically linked to changing situations during cyberattacks. First-year activities include cybersecurity workforce frameworks used to develop six course outlines, a certificate of achievement, and an AS degree in DFIR. An advisory board provided information about in-demand job skills for industry and government work roles to ensure that the courses meet current industry needs. The presentation will cover grant activities completed, along with activities planned for the next two years. Tobi West (twest20@coastline.edu), Coastline College, Garden Grove, CA; Anna Carlin, Fullerton College, Fullerton, CA


WORKFORCE DIVERSITY

VIDEO How ATE PIs at HSIs Engage Hispanic Students in Technician Programs
How ATE PIs at HSIs Engage Hispanic Students in Technician Programs Learn how ATE PIs at 2-year Hispanic serving institutions (HSI) are recruiting and retaining Hispanic students in technician programs to increase ATE and STEM workforce diversity. Panelists share challenges and tips for engaging Hispanic and other underrepresented students while creating inclusive STEM learning environments where all students are treated as motivated learners and made to feel welcome. The moderator, an experienced Hispanic PI who runs an ATE Center, leads the panel discussion and fields audience questions. Relevant resources for engaging Hispanic students are also discussed. (This session was originally recorded at the Fall 2019 ATE PI Conference.) Moderator: Mel Cossette (mel.cossette@edcc.edu), MatEdU. Panelists: Diego Tibaquira, Miami Dade College Eduardo J. Padrón Campus; Ronnie Brannon, Palo Alto College; Chander Arora, Los Angeles Mission College (PLEASE NOTE: This session was originally presented on April 2, 2020, as a webinar titled Culturally Responsive Instruction in HSIs.)

VIDEO Increasing Equity in STEM and CTE with OER
Increasing Equity in STEM and CTE with OER This presentation focuses on using open education resources (OER) in STEM and CTE courses as a way of promoting equity by reducing costs for learning materials. Esperanza Zenon (ezenon@rpcc.edu), River Parishes Community College, Gonzales, LA

VIDEO Strategies for Advancing Technician Education at Two-Year Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSI)
Strategies for Advancing Technician Education at Two-Year Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSI) Already serving 56 percent of Latin(x) postsecondary students, two-year HSIs can now access help in addressing the opportunities and challenges encountered in serving Latin(x) students in advanced technological education programs. The HSI ATE Hub provides curated resources and specialized faculty assistance in developing grant proposals and increasing the internal capacity of two-year HSIs to advance technician education. This session highlights a sample resource that emphasizes culturally sensitive instruction to help close achievement gaps for Latin(x) students and a survey tool for helping faculty hone in on what constitutes a learning environment that is both academically rigorous and culturally balanced. Elaine Craft (ecraft.scate@gmail.com), HSI ATE Hub – Diversifying the ATE Program with Hispanic Serving Institutions Using Culturally Inclusive Mentoring and ATE Resources, Florence, SC; Cynthia Pickering, SFAz (Science Foundation Arizona) Center for STEM at Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ

VIDEO The Art of Negotiation: Self-Advocacy 101
The Art of Negotiation: Self-Advocacy 101 Successful negotiation—in both one-on-one and group settings—often plays a critical role in advancing educational, career, and programmatic objectives, yet few people have training in effectively managing these interactions. This session presents practical and effective strategies for negotiating in the classroom, professional settings, and other environments. Topics include identifying short- and long-term negotiation goals, key elements of a successful negotiation (e.g., negotiation styles, anchoring the zone, and handling difficult conversations and people), the importance of active listening, and appreciating different viewpoints. Geraldine Richmond (richmond@uoregon.edu), University of Oregon, Eugene, OR; Roger Ebbage, Lane Community College, Eugene, OR

VIDEO Engaging Industry: Promoting Equity, Access & Inclusivity for Increased Retention and Productivity
Engaging Industry: Promoting Equity, Access & Inclusivity for Increased Retention and Productivity This presentation outlines the inclusive training for internship mentors/employers and interns/trainees developed in collaboration between the Biotechnology Program at City College of San Francisco and the Office of Career Planning & Development at the University of California, San Francisco, and the efforts to engage a large employer (UCSF) in building inclusive workplaces to support diversity and improve equity and access for community college students. Karen Leung (karen.leung@mail.ccsf.edu), James Lewis, City College of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA